Installing WordPress on OpenBSD 6.0 with Httpd

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Introduction

In the previous posts, we setup a minimal but secure web server using OpenBSD 6.0. In this post, we start from a fresh install with httpd, MariaDB and PHP 5.6.23 setup on the host. In most cases, you may now want to install a web application on it. One of the most popular is WordPress. If you have followed all the steps in the previous tutorial, installing WordPress will be fairly easy. However, because the web server is sand boxed in OpenBSD, many issues can arise. Additionally, introduction of new application may also introduce new security concerns. In this tutorial, we go through the basics of setting the database and configuring the application. We’ll also assume that you have the networking aspect configured and working. You can also consult the accompanying video.

Setting Up WordPress 4.7 on OpenBSD 6.0

To install WordPress on OpenBSD 6.0 using the native httpd web server requires quite a few steps, but most are straightforward and requires only some Linux command shell knowledge. It’s a good idea to be well-versed in the Bash scripting language and basic Linux/OpenBSD knowledge. In any case, following the steps below will get you going with your new WordPress blog in no time.

Downloading WordPress

Once validated, unzip and untar the archive into your web root directory, likely /var/www/htdocs using:

This will untar all files into /var/www/htdocs/wordpress. Feel free to rename the wordpress directory to anything you’d like.

Configuring the Database

In previous post, we installed MariaDB and thus this section will assume you have installed this database application. Otherwise, refer to the documentation of your database to use the proper SQL statements to create databases, users and manage permissions.

Log into the MariaDB database using  mysql -u root -p your_password . If you are logging from a remote location, use the  -h host argument. Once logged in, we will conduct 3 steps:

    1. Create a database for the WordPress application:

    1. Create a user for WordPress to use in order to connect to the database by using the following SQL statement:

    1. Grant permissions to the new user in order to edit the database and tables as required:

Now, the WordPress application has a place to store data on our database. Before we proceed thought, I encourage you to look at the ~/.mysql_history for a glimpse of what happened while you were doing the steps above. As you will see, the password for the user has been logged into this file. Remove this file with rm ~/.mysql_history  and let’s disable logging to prevent such leaks by adding this line in your rc.conf.local file:

Installing WordPress

From a remote host, use your favorite browser and go to https://<your_address>/wordpress/ and the installer should popup automatically. The first step is create the configuration file by filling information about the database. So gather the following information, which we have from the previous section and click “Let’s Go“:

  1. Database name: Database name use with the “CREATE DATABASE” SQL statement, i.e. “db_wordpress
  2. Database username: Username enter in the “CREATE USER” SQL statement, i.e. “wp_user
  3. Database password: type in your password;
  4. Database host; Enter 127.0.0.1 or ::1. Do not leave it as “localhost” as we want to use the sockets;
  5. Table prefix; Prefix for each table created. Unless you plan to have multiple WordPress sites, leave the default value.
Wordpress Installer Welcome Page
The WordPress Installer will guide you step-by-step on setting it up.

On the next page, enter the required data and click “Submit“. If every thing is setup right, you will be prompted to continue with the setup of the site. However, you may also get a blank “step2” page, i.e. the URL will be “setup-config.php?step=2” but nothing will show up. This problem can be caused by many different things. First, make sure you have setup PHP to use your MySQL database by enabling the proper extensions in the php-5.6.ini configuration file. See previous post for an explanation on how to do this.

Next issue you may encounter is a warning that WordPress cannot create the wp-config.php file. This is mostly due to permissions issues with /var/www/htdocs/wordpress/. The best option is to manually create the file by copy-pasting its contents. Another alternative is to temporarily change the permissions of the directory to allow write permissions with  chmod 777 /var/www/htdocs/wordpress for the installer to create the file. Doing so allows anyone to write and execute code to your directory and as such, it must be change immediately after you are finished installing and configuring WordPress.

Wordpress Fail to Create Wp-config.php
WordPress warns that it could not create the wp-config.file.

Quick Hardening

Before calling “Mission Accomplished”, take some time to test your new site and set the proper file permissions. Create a test post and try to upload an image to it. You may find that it fails, again because of permission issues. According to [1], you should have the following permissions for your WordPress install:

  • Folder set to 755;and
  • Files set to 644, except wp-config.php should be 440 or 400

This can be done with the following commands;

Furthermore, note the following quote from [1]:

No directories should ever be given 777, even upload directories. Since the php process is running as the owner of the files, it gets the owners permissions and can write to even a 755 directory.

Meaning that you should avoid the temptation to solve your uploads issues, or any other issues by setting full permissions, even the upload folder. Based on [2], all files outside the wp-content directory should be owned by your OpenBSD user account so they cannot be modified. The owner of the wp-content will be set to www and will be writable, allowing uploads of files themes and plugins. Note that once you chose your theme and plugins, you could further harden your blog by restricting the wp-content/themes and wp-content/plugins directories as some attackers hide web shells in those.

Retest to make sure it works.

Upload Failures due to Directory Permissions
Setting the minimal and proper permissions on the Uploads directory is critical.

One last quick thing you may want to do is delete unneeded installation files.  WordPress should have remove them for you, but just double check. You can also remove the readme.html and any release notes that may be present, this way, it will be harder for an attacker to find the version of your WordPress installation.

Conclusion

WordPress becomes insecure when adding plugins, which introduces the majority of new vulnerabilities. As such, attempt to avoid unnecessary plugins and themes and uninstall them once they are unneeded. Also enable auto-updates. There are quite further actions you can take to harden your WordPress install, and I’d recommend reading the reference at [1]. You can also review the database permissions you have granted to the “wp_user” in MariaDB, and possibly restrict them to simply INSERT/UPDATE/SELECT/DELETE instructions. Then test your installation with wp-scan, a great, free and open-source WordPress vulnerability assessment.

References

[1] Hardening WordPress, Core Directories/Files, WordPress.org, https://codex.wordpress.org/Hardening_WordPress (accessed on 2017-01-09)

[2] Correct File Permissions for WordPress, StackOverflow, http://stackoverflow.com/questions/18352682/correct-file-permissions-for-wordpress, (accessed on 2017-01-16)

See Also