Integrity OS to be Released Commercially

The Integrity Operating System, an OS with the highest security rating from the National Security Agency (NSA) and used by the military, will now be sold to the private sector by Integrity Global Security, a subsidiary of Green Hills Software. The commercial operating system will be based on the Integrity 178-B OS, which was used in the 1997 B1B Bomber and afterwards in F-16, F-22 and F-35 military jets. It is also used in the Airbus 380 and Boeing 787 airplanes[1].

The Integrity 178-B OS has been certified EAL6+ (Evaluation Assurance Level 6) by the NSA and is the only OS to have achieve this level of security for now. Most commercial operating systems such as Windows and Linux distributions have an EAL4+ certification. The EAL is a certification which indicates a degree of security of the operation system, level 1 is about applications having been tested but where a security breach would not incurs serious threats. A level 7, the highest level, contains applications strong enough to resist a high risk of threats and can withstand sophisticated attacks. Only one application has a level 7 certification and it is the Tenix Data Diode by Tenix America[2].

The Integrity OS can run by itself or with other operating systems on top, such as Windows, Linux, MacOS, Solaris, VxWorks, Palm OS and even Symbian OS. Each OS being in is own partition to limit the eventual failures and security vulnerabilities to the OS only.

Product

Type

Protection Profile

Security Level

INTEGRITY

Operating System

SKPP

EAL 6+

Linux

Operating System

CAPP, LSPP

EAL 4+

PR/SM LPAR Hypervisor

Virtualization

Custom

EAL 5

SELinux

Operating System

Not evaluated

EAL 4+

Solaris (and Trusted Solaris)

Operating System

CAPP, LSPP

EAL 4+

STOP OS

Operating System

CAPP, LSPP

EAL 5

VMware

Virtualization

Custom

EAL 4+

Windows Vista

Operating System

Not evaluated

EAL 4+

Windows XP

Operating System

CAPP

EAL 4+

Xen

Virtualization

Not evaluated

EAL 4+

Main Operating Systems with the type of protection profile used and the assigned EAL[3]

The main feature of the Integrity OS is the use of the Separation Kernel Protection Profile (SKPP). A protection profile (PP) is a document used by the certification process, which describes the security requirements for a particular problem. The SKPP is a standard developed by the NSA and in which the requirements for a high robustness operating system are defined and are based on John Rushby‘s concept of Separation Kernel. This concept can be summarized as:

… a single-processor model of a distributed system in which all user processes are separated in time and space from each other. In a distributed system, the execution of each process takes place in a manner independent of any other[4]

Basically, the concept is about a computer simulating a distributed environment, and each process is independent from the other, thus preventing that a corrupted or breached application gives inavertedly access to restricted resources, as it is often the case in privilege escalation in other commercial OS.

Schema of the Integrity 178B Operating System
Schema of the Integrity 178B Operating System

What makes SKPP standard so secure is that it requires a formal method of verification during the development. Furthermore, the source code is examined by a third party, in this case, the NSA.

SKPP separation mechanisms, when integrated within a high assurance security architecture, are appropriate to support critical security policies for the Department of Defense (DoD), Intelligence Community, the Department of Homeland Security, Federal Aviation Administration, and industrial sectors such as finance and manufacturing.[5]

Of course, the OS might be conceived for security and toughness, but in the end, it all depends on how it is used and configured…That’s going to be the real test. As far as I believe the people who verified the OS are competent, and all the expensive tests the company has paid to check their operating system are rigorous, the real exam would be to release it in the wild so that hackers from all around the world can have a try at it. Hopefully, we might be able to play with this OS someday…

See also:

U.S. Government Protection Profile for Separation Kernels in Environments Requiring High Robustness“, Information Assurance Directorate, June 29, 2007

Formal Refinement for Operating System Kernels, Chapter 4 p. 203-209“, Iain D. Craig, Springer London, Springer Link, July 2007

Separation kernel for a secure real-time operating system“, Rance J. DeLong, Safety Critical Embedded Systems, February 2008, p.22

Controlled Access Protection Profile“, Information Systems Security Organization, National Security Agency, October 8, 1999


[1] “Secure OS Gets Highest NSA Rating, Goes Commercial”, Kelly Jackson Higgins, DarkReading, November 18, 2008, http://www.darkreading.com/security/app-security/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=212100421 (accessed on November 19, 2008)

[2] “TENIX Interactive Lin k solutions”, TENIX America, http://www.tenixamerica.com/images/white_papers/datasheet_summary.pdf (accessed on November 19, 2008)

[3] “The Gold Standard for Operating System Security: SKPP”, David Kleidermacher, Integrity Global Security, 2008, http://www.integrityglobalsecurity.com/downloads/SKPPGoldenStandardWhitePaper.pdf (accessed on November 19, 2008)

[4] “Formal Refinement for Operating System Kernels”, Iain D. Craig, Springer London, Springer Link, July 2007, p. 203

[5] “U.S. Government Protection Profile for Separation Kernels in Environments Requiring High Robustness”, Information Assurance Directorate, June 29, 2007, p.10

Author: Jonathan Racicot

INTJ, goa trance, RE, python, malware, wine, books, french bulldogs, genetics, biohacking, CtF, night owl, transhumanist, AI, machines, cyber ops.

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